Banana-Breaded Bliss

There’s nothing that hits the spot quite like warm banana bread fresh out of the oven on a chilly-and-waiting-for-snow-on-the-last-day-of-April-even-though-it-was-70°+-yesterday-because-Colorado-has-multiple-personality-disorder day.

Growing up, my Mom made banana bread often, and there was never much of it leftover. Because I can’t summons my Mom to make me whatever I want at my beck and call, which is a huge bummer, I have got to be the banana bread queen now.

I can honestly say that before today, I have never before made banana bread. Yay for turning over a new leaf! Or banana peel.

I didn’t have my Mom’s banana bread recipe at the time, which is also my Grandma’s, so I found a different one to use:

Shrinking Kitchen’s Best Ever Banana Bread

Prep Time: 15 minutes             Cook Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 1 hour, 25 minutes

Yield: 12 slices/loaf                   Serving Size: 1 slice

Best-Ever Banana Bread {vegan-friendly, too!}

Gather

1 cup all purpose flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 tsp cinnamon
6 Tbsp margarine {I used vegan spread}
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
3 over-ripe bananas
1/4 cup non-dairy milk {I used almond milk}
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
1 tsp vanilla extract

Step by step

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Lightly grease loaf pan w/cooking spray.
  3. In large bowl {i just throw everything in my stand mixer}, combine flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon.
  4. In another bowl, cream together margarine, brown sugar, white sugar, bananas, vanilla, milk and cider.
  5. Combine wet and dry ingredients.
  6. Pour batter in your loaf pan and bake for 60-70 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.
  7. Remove from oven and cool.
  8. Notes: I used my Kitchen-Aid mixer and simply added in all the ingredients as they are listed above. One bowl. Less clean-up. Delicious. WIN.

I altered a few things with this recipe. I didn’t have regular white sugar so I used coconut palm sugar. I used 2 cups of whole wheat flour instead of 1 cup of white flour. I also added sunflower seeds to mine, too.

I highly suggest that, unlike myself, you have or purchase a mixer – smashing bananas and ‘creaming’ ingredients together by hand is hard. I most definitely think I got my arm workout in for the day.

While this recipe is delicious, my roots tie me to the family recipe.

Directly copied and pasted from my email, here it is.

Banana Bread from Grandma Judy

3-4 ripe bananas
1/2 c. brown sugar
1/2 c. white sugar
1/2 c. oil  (not olive oil)
2 eggs
2 Tbs. sour milk  (put in cup and add a little white vinegar; this makes it sour)
2 c. flour
1 tsp. soda
1 tsp. salt
1/2 c. walnuts

Preheat oven to 350°
Mix brown sugar, white sugar and oil in bowl with mixer.  Add eggs and
sour milk and mix really well. Add bananas and mix really well. Add salt,
soda and flour and mix really well. Add walnuts and mix really well.

Use cooking spray in loaf pans and coat with flour.  Discard
any extra flour.  Pour in batter to about half full.  This will make 1
large loaf or 2 medium or 4 small loaves.

For a large loaf bake for about 55 minutes
For medium bake for about 50 minutes
For small bake for about 45 minutes

Check for the crack along the top and no “gooey” and golden brown.

Enjoy!

There are a ton of recipes out there. Do you have a family or favorite one? I’d love to try it out.

It’s good hot, cold, toasted, with butter, with peanut butter, with chocolate chips, with blueberries, plain, for breakfast, for lunch, for dinner, for a snack….you get the idea.

And that’s my banana-breaded bliss. Perfect for a freak winter storm warning on the last day of April.

Advertisements

Playing With Needles

So. I’ve been a slacker. A big one. BUT that’s not to say I haven’t been doing anything. In fact, for the past 4 weeks I have been learning a skill that will take me far in life. It has been tough, grueling, and time-consuming. Many will attempt, but few will find the will power to carry on and succeed. With the help of lessons and a guru, I have been able to create a piece of art with my newly attained talent.

Watch out, world! I’m learning to knit!

I bought my Mom and I knitting classes for Christmas and we’ve been on the journey to become knitting fiends! We’ve been going to Your Daily Fiber, where Ivy, our instructor, has been incessantly patient with us. After 4 weeks, and many many MANY mistakes -and an impressive vocabulary of colorful words directed at the yarn and knitting needles-, I have finished my first project. My new work of art will be displayed for all to see…on my head. I made a beanie! Colorado has been so accommodating during this time by providing cold temperatures and several Spring snowstorms so that I might be able to actually wear it before we reach scorching Summer temps -in which case I will STILL wear it.

IMG_0583

AND it’s bright orange, which makes it that much better.

Diving into the knitting world, you have to learn not only a new language with your hands -how to hold the needles, what to do with the yarn, how to determine when you’ve dropped a stitch, how to refrain from giving your project the middle finger-, but also a new vocabulary. Purl, knit, turn, block, finish, sock stitch, rib, cast on, etc. I’m slowly catching on to these and am able to sometimes use them correctly so I don’t sound quite as moronic to our knitting instructor -who is amazing by the way…and did I mention very patient?-.

I don’t know how to read patterns yet, so I just did what Ivy told me, which worked out pretty well for the most part. For this project, and for my particular stitches, I cast on 80, knit 1 purl 1 for 2 inches, knit in the round for 6 inches, knit 8 stitch 2 together for 1 row, knit one row, knit 7 stitch 2 together for one row, knit one row, knit 6 stitch 2 together for one row, knit one row….all the way down. Finish by sewing the top stitches together and bringing them through the top of the hat (I know what I’m trying to say, but not really sure how to say it. Obviously.). Sew in your yarn tails.

If that made any sense to you, you are a knitting professional, because I just re-read it and it looks like gibberish.

IMG_0589

IMG_0590

For my first project, I think it turned out pretty well. Because I’m still very new to this, I think I’m going to sign up for more classes so that I can learn to read a pattern, and hopefully learn to fix mistakes myself without completely crumbling and having a mild panic attack every time I drop a stitch.

Although Summer is fast-approaching, you will be able to pick me out of a crowd. I’ll be the one in a tank top, shorts, sandals, and a bright orange beanie.

And maybe socks, if I make those next.

Project suggestions are welcome! I’ve already been encouraged to try my hand at knitted underwear…..

 

Vegan Diaries – The Final Countdown

Originally posted on http://shrinkingjeans.net

vegan diaries

As of today, I have successfully been a vegan since March 11. That’s about 5 weeks, people! I have been diligent and faithful with minor unintentional slip-ups. And guess what? I survived! It IS possible to go vegan without starving yourself or depleting your body of the vitamins and minerals it needs. In fact, I have eaten cleaner and healthier in the past 5 weeks than I can remember doing before. I didn’t really lose weight (maybe a pound or 2), I didn’t become anemic, and I didn’t join PETA. But I did learn a great deal more about food than I ever thought was possible, and has sent me on a mission to be much more aware of what I put into my body from here on out.

As a way to commemorate my last few days of this vegan challenge, I hosted a vegan potluck where people crept out of their comfort zone and made some dang delicious vegan grub. Simply seeing that vegan smorgasbord brought me great happiness. Some of the scrumptious dishes provided (and devoured) included:

SOOOO much good food and a fun thing to share with friends. Everything turned out great and everyone enjoyed themselves, sans dairy and meat and all.

Learning and researching have been important aspects in this journey. And insanely eye-opening. Among the documentaries I watched, the articles I read, and the book I devoured, I have discovered there is a great deal more about the food industry that is not necessarily common knowlege, and not necessarily advertised. You have to search out the information, take the initiative to read and research it, and have the diligence to apply it to your every day consumption.

A few of the areas that I am much more aware (i.e. a label-reading fiend) include:

  • Corn and its many different masks. Corn is in just about everything at the grocery store, but may be labeled something different depending on its purpose in the food.
  • Sugar and sugar substitutes. Fake, real, or what have you, something sweet is added to many different products that wouldn’t even necessarily call for it. Not only am I looking for this culprit, but where exactly it is on the ingredient label. Remember, the higher up on the list, the more it makes up that particular product.
  • Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Holy yikes! They are in EVERYTHING! It’s hard to stay away, especially because they are labeled as so many different things, but chances are most of the items in your grocery cart contain them. There are organizations and companies out there who will provide labels on their products if they do not contain GMOs, such as the Non-GMO Project.
  • Enriched vs. Unenriched ingredients. Enriched flour, sugar, etc. is processed so that it is stripped of any nutritional value, but is made to have a longer shelf-life and a more concentrated flavor.
  • Artificial food dyes. This is an issue most people don’t necessarily think about. Artificial food dyes are in many foods that you wouldn’t even think of: marshmallows, pickles, chocolate pudding. Not only are most of them petroleum based, the chemical make-up can cause a whole mess of health problems. Although they may be FDA approved, in many other countries a warning label is required to inform consumers that there are unnatural food dyes added.
  • Grass fed vs. not; farm fresh vs. not; organic vs. not.

It baffles me that we must become our own educators when it comes to our food. Many people won’t. We put faith in a system with little question, because we don’t think it would fail us to the point of allowing harmful products to be obtained. That’s just wishful thinking. It’s not about the good of the society anymore; it’s about marketing and target audiences and pretty colors and enhanced flavors. It’s about the money. Bottom line. Priorities have certainly become skewed, and we’re supposed to fall victim unless we have the audacity to go beyond what we’re being sold and dig a little deeper. And I do.

As a recap, these are some of the places I got my information, education, recipes, inspiration, and motivation.

Documentaries

Books

Websites (blogs, recipes, etc.)

Additionally, when I first started this journey, I set some goals for myself. I feel I have accomplished and exceeded even my own expectations. They included:

  • Become more familiar with the vegan/vegetarian community
  • Gain an appreciation for a strict plant-based diet
  • Actually cook a few recipes from the cookbook
  • DON’T CHEAT
  • Be an inspiration (hopefully) for those interested in trying it
  • Learn – I feel like this will be happening a lot
  • Have fun!

I have most certainly learned, become appreciative, and had fun throughout this challenge. It wasn’t all easy and wasn’t all hard; it was an adjustment. My mom has told me she has started reading labels more carefully when she goes grocery shopping. I’ll count that as being an inspiration. Who knows, maybe I’ve struck something in someone else along the way, too.

What now? Honestly, I’m not quite sure. What I do know is that I will be making more educated decisions about what I eat. I also intend to severely limit my meat and dairy in-take going forward. My new goals are to buy local (when possible), stay educated about what I’m eating, continue to read labels, cut out what my body doesn’t need, eat clean, and make choices that will benefit me in the long run. Armed with information, I plan on applying it as much as possible when it comes to food choices.

Whether vegan, vegetarian, or omnivore, it’s important to educate yourself about what you’re putting in your body. If I am to take one thing from this entire experience, that would be the meat tofu of it all.

Vegan Diaries – Comfort Zone

Originally posted on http://shrinkingjeans.net

vegan diaries

Well that’s it. It’s over. I officially give up on this vegan challenge and lifestyle. Sayonara veganness, welcome back meat and dairy!

APRIL FOOLS!

I just couldn’t help myself. *Chuckle*

All joking aside, week 3 has probably been the toughest week so far in this challenge. Not due to a waning enthusiasm for all things vegan, not due to overwhelming cravings for pork chops or cheesecake, and not due to peer pressure or arguments against veganism. It was due to little things here and there that added up over the course of the week: my boyfriend decided he couldn’t hack the vegan lifestyle (proving once again that women are the stronger sex) and went back to eating ‘normally;’ I went to a family dinner that displayed homemade chocolate-chip cookies and cheese-and-meat-laden dishes; above all, I was ridiculously sick and in dire need of comfort food (and an exquisite compilation of cold and flu medication). When I think comfort food, I think hearty, homemade, stick-to-your-ribs food that satisfies some innate insatiable hunger for said dishes, which, somehow also make you feel better no matter how crummy you feel or sick you are. Miracle food, if you will. The problem with most ‘comfort food’ dishes is that they have some combination of meat or dairy in them. I attempted to combat the comfort food stereotype and create versions that maintained the vegan credentials. Therefore, there will be no ‘Eat Of The Week,’ but instead:

Comfort Food(s) Of The Week

Let’s start with the Italian-turned-American-defining dish that can be tailored to innumerable desires, satisfy the pickiest of eaters, and hold its own in the comfort food category: Pizza. There are few and far between who can turn down a piece of piping-hot pizza straight out of the oven, bursting with gooey cheeses and a plethora of delicious toppings, creating a perfect harmony of sweet, salty, and savory flavors delivered directly to your taste buds. You can be as creative or simple as you’d like with pizza, which is one of the love-evoking characteristics. For vegan pizza, there are a few caveats: thou shalt not have cheese, pepperoni, sausage, ham, canadian bacon, buttered crust, or fake-ground parmesan for topping. There are thousands of homemade pizza recipes online. I (sadly) did not take a picture of the final product, but this is essentially how it went down:

  • Homemade whole-wheat, seasoned, agave drizzled crust
  • Arrabiata sauce (now we have sweet AND spicy) – ‘doctor’ up your sauce however you’d like
  • Sautéed portabella mushrooms, spinach, and onions with olive oil and Italian seasonings
  • Sliced white onion, green and red bell peppers, olives, tomatoes
  • Garnish/top with a little sea salt, fresh spinach (you can let it wilt on the hot pizza), basil, and if you’re like me red pepper flakes

I actually didn’t even miss the cheese!

While pizza is a nice start to some comfort food-filled days, there’s one thing that I kept thinking about over and over again.

Homemade macaroni and cheese.

I grew up spoiled. We rarely had mac n cheese out of a box; it was always a deliciously creamy 3 to 5 cheese dish of baked goodness that my mom ruined us with. Others rarely compare, and the boxed stuff is just out of the question. I even made it as my ‘American’ homemade dish for my Peruvian family when I studied abroad. That and guacamole. Separately, of course. They LOVED it! But, I digress. Cheese is nixed from the vegan food pyramid, so I went searching the web for ideas. I found one from Chef Chloe, whose cookbook I bought, and decided to give it a go. It had great reviews and sounded delicious.

Vegan Mac ‘N’ Cheese

I followed this recipe exact, not knowing exactly how these ingredients worked together. The resulting product actually looked like mac n cheese, so that was very exciting! As I dug into my pseudo cheesy noodles and broccoli, delicious as it was, I was a little disheartened. Don’t get me wrong, it had great flavor and texture, but it definitely left something to be desired for the cheese factor. Pushing aside the inclination to compare it to the mac n cheese I’m used to, I embraced the noodle dish I had created. It would be a great alternative for those who cannot have cheese. For those who can but are looking to try something different, go for it, but think of it as a new dish altogether, and not necessarily as the mac n cheese that you’re used to.

macncheese

Vegan Mac ‘N’ Cheese

Of course, with comfort food you have to factor in something sweet, and, preferably chocolatey. I found a recipe for a vegan chocolate orange pudding, which fit in line with the comfort food theme. I have never been a fan of jello or pudding (I think it’s a texture thing), but the combination of orange and chocolate kept me coming back to the recipe. It’s about trying new things, so why not?

Chocolate Orange Pudding

The recipe turned out to be a complete disaster, so I’m not even going to post it on here. I dug deep and bribed my inner Betty Crocker to come save me on this one. The final product actually turned out beautifully. This is essentially what I did:

  • 1 ½ ripe avocados
  • Almond milk (unsweetened)
  • Unsweetened cocoa powder
  • Agave nectar
  • Orange zest
  • Garnish with small orange slices
  • Refrigerate for at least 1 hour prior to servingchoc orange pudding

Forgive the vague measurements – I literally have NO idea how much of everything I put in there. Like I said, I started from scratch since the recipe led me down the pudding path of Hell (glimpse: fake vegan chocolate chip explosion in microwave, insta-drying to vegan chocolate cement). I do know that I put A LOT of agave nectar to sweeten it. You could use whatever sweetener you’d like. You could also start out with sweetened cocoa powder – the unsweetened stuff was all I had. Additionally, I put the avocado, almond milk, and cocoa powder in the blender to smooth everything out. I added the agave nectar and orange zest separately and mixed everything in a bowl. It turned out so creamy. I would say it made about 3 cups of pudding total. Oh, and HOLY CHOCOLATE GODS THAT’S GOOD!

Eye-Opener Of The Week

DIVE!

This 54-minute documentary takes us in to the world of wasted food. Directed by Jeremy Seifert, this documentary follows a group of dumpster divers who routinely get their food from big name grocery chain dumpsters, and exposes the wastefulness of the American consumer, grocery chain, and producer. In America, 96 billion pounds of food are thrown away every year. That’s about HALF the food that gets produced. “We pressure supermarkets, hotels, restaurants, and corporations to Save More and Waste Less. We highlight the role of hunger, poverty, and waste in society and take this on as an issue of justice, ethics, morality, and common sense. We imagine a world of empty dumpsters, full bellies, and regular people leading sustainable lives.” Seifert attempts to explore hunger in America, the amount food waste, and the large gap that could be closed as a result of wasted food ending up in hungry hands. He talks with food banks that acknowledge they have an annual food shortage, and continually strive to feed those in need. While many grocery stores and chains have agreements with food banks, that’s not always the case and there are many clauses and circumstances that create, what should be an easy process, a convoluted one. This award-winning film is literally an eye-opener to a world of waste that rarely comes to the forefront of current societal issues, and up until now, to my mind.

Director Jeremy Seifert is planning to launch another documentary this year that focuses on GMOs and the companies behind them. With the current controversy surrounding Monsanto, as well as GMOs in general, this film is sure to spark the interest of many. Check out the trailer here.

With a tough week behind me, I can keep my focus strong on the next 2 weeks of this challenge. Sometimes the desires of comfort and familiarity can be a learning curve that force us to think a different way. And sometimes that way is out of our comfort zone.